The senses are restless while the breath is clam. The souls are dancing while the bodies are still

Jean Blazer is an alternative group that combines the elegance of jazz, blues and soul, with the sensitivity of a singer-songwriter style.
The group was founded in 2015 by Víctor Batista (vocals and composer), Samuel Miranda (Piano and composer) and Alba Cabero (cello).
Let us seduce you with our JAZZY POP music.
Listen to our songs

We adapt our flexible repertoire to your event’s necessities, to create the perfect musical background making it memorable.


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Piano


The piano was founded on earlier technological innovations in keyboard instruments. Pipe organs have been used since Antiquity, and as such, the development of pipe organs enabled instrument builders to learn about creating keyboard mechanisms for sounding pitches. The first string instruments with struck strings were the hammered dulcimers,[5] which were used since the Middle Ages in Europe. During the Middle Ages, there were several attempts at creating stringed keyboard instruments with struck strings.[6] By the 17th century, the mechanisms of keyboard instruments such as the clavichord and the harpsichord were well developed.

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Voice


The human voice consists of sound made by a human being using the vocal tract, such as talking, singing, laughing, crying, screaming, etc. The human voice frequency is specifically a part of human sound production in which the vocal folds (vocal cords) are the primary sound source. Other sound production mechanisms produced from the same general area of the body involve the production of unvoiced consonants, clicks, whistling and whispering. Generally speaking, the mechanism for generating the human voice can be subdivided into three parts; the lungs, the vocal folds within the larynx (voice box), and the articulators. The lung, the "pump" must produce adequate airflow and air pressure to vibrate vocal folds. The vocal folds (vocal cords) then vibrate to use airflow from the lungs to create audible pulses that form the laryngeal sound source[1].

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Cello


The name cello is derived from the ending of the Italian violoncello,[2] which means "little violone". The violone ("big viol") was the lowest-pitched instrument of the viol family, the group of stringed instruments that went out of fashion around the end of the 17th century in most countries except France, where they survived another half-century before the louder violin family came into greater favour in that country as well. In modern symphony orchestras, it is the second largest stringed instrument (the double bass is the largest). Thus, the name "violoncello" contained both the augmentative "-one" ("big") and the diminutive "-cello" ("little").